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clinton. >> funding "to the contrary" provided by... funding "to the contrary" provided by -- >> this week on "to the contrary," former secretary of state hillary clinton. >> women will yell. women try to human man nice human rights so i know it's penetrated the world culture. >> what would you say if you don't under up running for president? >> hello, i'm bonnie erbe. welcome to the special edition of "to the contrary." this week an interview with former secretary of state hillary clinton. i sat down with her to talk about her incredible legacy for women and girls. >> you have changed the world for women and girls. where did your passion for this issue come from? >> i think it came from my childhood. it probably came from learning about the difficult childhood my mother had and how important it was for girls to be given the same opportunities as boys. i think it came from my own experience as a kind of tomboy, playing in the neighborhood and hearing every so often, well, you know, girls can't play. it probably was something that was really a part of the atmosphere that
. >> brown: secretary of state hillary clinton logged nearly a million miles visiting more than 100 countries in the last four years. ray suarez examines her legacy. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: and we close with a preview of sunday's big game. npr's mike pesca joins us from new orleans, site of super bowl xlvii. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: for the second time in five months, a u.s. diplomatic post has been the target of a deadly assault. a suicide bomber detonated a vest with explosiv
-bye to the secretary. hillary clinton bids farewell to the state department after four years at the helm. >> i hope that you will continue to make yourselves, make me and make our country proud. thank you all and god bless you. >> and seven years after hurricane katrina, the superdome in new orleans gets ready to host the super bowl in the big easy signature style. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and also around the globe. tonight the obama administration denounces the assault on the u.s. embassy in turkey as a terrorist attack. a suicide bomber blew himself up at a security gate killing a turkish security guard and injuring those nearby. according to turkish prime minister, an outlawed marxist group is responsible for the violence. our james reynolds is on the scene and filed this report. >> america's foreign missions are as much fortresses as embassies. this is why. this afternoon, a suicide bomber got to the gate of the u.s. embassy but but no further. his explosives detonated as a checkpoint. the bomber and a turkish security guard were killed. >> i wasn't sure what the e
chapter in my life. >> hillary clinton, outgoing secretary of state. what chapter would that be, mark? >> i think it is the resurrection. this was someone who left the presidential campaign bruising in 2008, and to see her potentially eight years later as the overwhelming front runner for the democratic nomination is a remarkable comeback. >> john kerry of proof for secretary of state 94-3. what are his challenges? >> remaining consistent with the administration's policy. that will be a challenge, that he does not go on his own and make his own policy. i do not see him perform in a way hillary clinton performed. she was part of a team. he has wanted this job so long and so bad they, he has no notion of what the secretary of state would look like. i think he will be a problem. >> i want to say something about hillary clinton. you see how great her presence has been, what a successful secretary of state she has been. any time conservatives can, they want to take a knife to her throat, and guess what? she always turns it back on them. she has emerged as an incredible force. i hope she do
good at all sorts of small needlework greater than there is mining. tavis: you mentioned bill clinton, who has had a renaissance, and his numbers are as high-end as they have ever been. his numbers are often higher. he has been our point person on this project since the earthquake happened. assess with me how he has done. >> he could not get done the things he would like tto ge do .e he was on the interim commission for the recovery of haiti, and that was almost no as on the commission that lasted for two years. he raised a lot of money for president bush, and they spent about four loans of small businesses, and maybe that is a good idea, but they were the same kinds of businesses. they use earthquake money to do the same kinds of programs. clinton has a long relationship with haiti. the people he knows are not the most imaginative. they are the elite. that is normal. he is a former u.s. president. he does not get down and 30 in the shanty towns, but he needs to have people do that if he is going to continue. >> who is going to get down and dirty? >> i have a doctor. she is wonderful,
and blamed president clinton, but after a while the numbers went up. gingrich himself said it was the single most avoidable mistake house speaker. you can never be sure how these are going to play. it's a big gamble. >> he was time magazine's man of the year and he plummeted in popular support where he was at 16% favorable. that is just a little bit south of donald trump on a slow wednesday. that's really bad numbers. he never fully recovered from it. this is what the political backdrop is heading into this confrontation. the president's numbers are at the highest point in the past three years going back to late 2009 in his late honeymoon and republicans are at the lowest. he does have a political advantage, make no mistake about it. some republicans understand this but the core of the republicans in the house want this confrontation. >> if my emails are any indication, they are fed up with this and washington. >> there's no one to make a deal with right now on the republican side. they're very divided. a lot of republicans to have been around for awhile really don't like the idea of sequest
bill clinton saying the era of big government is over. by saying that he was going to act executive action if congress didn't act. and seeming very reasonable even though he wasn't combative, he was arguing to the country i think k en more to the congress. and then he did have some refrains in there that got a lot of applause. i remember in 6 5 lbj say how many times did they applause me. he understood the need for refrains and he came back to what he talked about in his inaugural, the role of citizens which mean he's trying to mobilize the country to put pressure on the congress to do the things he wants done. >> rose: walter what did you see as the theme of this statement. >> i thought it was a t continuation of the inaugural thing, which is inclusiveness and opportunity. that's the theme of our nation and that's what really separates his agenda, i think from some of his opponents which is we want to bring everybody in, we want there to be ladders of opportunity, doors of opportunity. and the fact it had a thematic connection to inaugural, that it is a place where opportunity an
by secretary of state... then secretary of state clinton and then head of c.i.a. general petraeus that we provide weapons to the resistance in syria? did you support that? >> we did. >> you did support that. >> we did. >> suarez: so far, the president's judgment has been that things won't get better with american arms. instead, he's warned the weapons might fall into the hands of extremist elements, a concern reiterated today by the new secretary of state, who was asked about the deliberations last year. >> i don't know what the discussions were in the white house and i'm not going backwards. the new administration, we're going forward from this point. there are serious questions about al nusra and a.q.i.-- al qaeda in iraq-- and other violent groups on ground. >> suarez: those groups are among the most effective fighters against the assad regime. they include jabhat al nusra, which the u.s. has declared a terrorist organization. but last november, a top rebel commander in northern syria, colonel abdul jabaar al aikidi, told "the newshour's" margaret warner the u.s. reasoning is a farce.
. >> that doesn't mean it's date did well. >> gerald ford, george h.w. bush, and little billy clinton. >> i don't think mark liked the speech. to bek, let's try slightly dispassionate about it. [laughter] you have a whole host of problems in society. the liberal answer is to find a government program that will fix it -- state of the union address. the conservative approach is in what way is the government's regulation, taxation, corruption, an hindrances of all kinds holding back this incredible engine of the private sector, which historically has provided unprecedented prosperity and liberty in america? that is the difference between the parties? rubio, if you look at the transcript -- i will not speak about his delivery. it was hot in there and he obviously was thirsty. [laughter] this transcript is an excellent presentation of the conservative argument that what is ailing america is sclerotic, obsolete, reactionary liberalism hanging onto every regulation, every increase in taxation it can get. i thought he did it well. the problem is he should have done it in a studio somewhere well prepare
clinton kind the famous phrase that the era of big government over, did president obama launch the era of smart government? >> that's going to depend on what side of the aisle you were sitting on when you listened to the speech. but one thing about the speech, there was just a lot in it. he touched every single domestic policy initiative he has ever put together before, even the things that sounded sort of new -- minimum wage, raising it to $9 an hour. in his first campaign, he campaigned on raising it to $9.50 an hour by 2011 but what really came through to me in that speech was his declaration that essentially after two years of doing nothing but fighting with republicans over deficit reduction, he was no longer going to have deficit reduction define policy setting in washington. he said a balanced budget is an important thing but it is not the same as an economic plan. and i think he did that, in part, because the deficit has begun to come down but also because he realizes that has constrained him in doing a lot of other things he wants to do in his second term joiment todd, you wro
, secretary clinton did, which mandated or agreed that there would be a political transition, that there would be opposition and government members of that transition and that the makeup would have to be mutually agreed to. of course it going to be mutually agreed to, you know the opposition would not have had assad going in this going forward that is where the breakdown of the russians has taken place. we continue to engage with them, meet with them regularly, we have not come to an agreement on a political way forward here. i hope we can do that. >> in the near term. >> well, i think the sooner the better as i said. now during the course of this year, the president will have the opportunity to meet with president putin on a number of occasions beginning this spring. >> but aren't you going to see putin soon wince i think i will visit russia in the next month. >> and see putin. >> yes. >> what do you want to come out of that and did you reset the relationship so that it's more likely that you can have, because if you have good big power understanding it gives you more leverage to deal with th
. president clinton did. deals between president clinton and speaker gingrich in the '95, '96, '97 time frame. we have come together a lot of times in our past we just can't seem to do it now. >> rose: what's changed. >> i think what has changed are these two things. one that it is tougher because resources are scarcer. and the numbers are so much bigger. and secondly, i do think we're living in a more polarized era. i there in one more thing. i think sadly we are living in a more selfish era. i think nobody really wants to pay the costs. for example, an average person at 65, about to enter medicare has paid $122,000 into the medicare system. >> rose: 122,000. >> thousand, they will get back inflation adjusted, they will get back $377,000 dollars over their ellerly years. you don't have to have study a lot of math to know those numbers don't work. and so all this debt we're piling up, these 800, 900 billion dollar deficits, all these promises, we're sticking on our children. and that to me is very depressing. >> rose: everybody believes the way out of this is to do two things. one is to have
world, secretary clinton said it's part of the solution, not part of the problem. >> right. >> it has really acquired a tremendous amount of respect. but people will be able to judge for themselves. >> rose: i will ask these questions because i want to gets some of them in. here is an obvious question but and that we should ask. is nuclear energy such as coal, fusion a true solution toned our dependence on fossil fuel and help curb global warming? >> well, it is certainly not a silver bullet it may play a limited role in the future. the present generation of nuclear technology is way too expensive. if you run a utility and you decide to build a new nuclear power plant, you go to your engineers or you go to any engineering consulting firm in the world and ask,okay, how much will this cost. they will say to you we really have no idea. >> right. >> then ask you them how long will it take to build it. and they'll say we don't know. >> and those are serious problems if you are trying to build a power plant. and that's really why the industry has declined. to state the issues, even after fu
, is darting for the pole in spring and the fact he could laugh the next day reminded me of bill clinton-- clinton getting him-- next night on the-- two nights later on the tonight show bill clinton said that was not the best hour of my life. it was probably not the best hour and a half. and the fact that he could laugh at himself, i think rubio may have bailed himself out. >> woodruff: political careers are often shaped by these responses. >> i agree with that. he did recover well. you known, i don't think his career is ended by an epic episode of dry mouth, mark often has that effect on me, actually. but i would say that i agree with mark that he reframed the republican story in this speech. given his own biography. he didn't really refrain-- reframe the republican philosophy it was very much small government versus big government. that's what we heard for a long time. i think republicans are going to have to have more than boot staps message. they're going to have to define a limited but active role as government to help people gain the skills they need to compete in the modern econom
in afghanistan and reinvest tremendously in asia. secretary clinton's first trip as secretary of state was to asia. that's the first time a secretary of state has taken his or her first trip to asia since dean rusk in 1961. and from then on she just kept on pushing our efforts and our efforts in asia. you look at her work with as on. you look at her work on the south china sea. you look at her work with burma in terms of bringing burma not community of democracy, potentially. right? that's a good list of contributions. >> tom donilon national security advisor to president obama as they enter the second four years of that tenure in the white house. thank you for joining us. see you next time. captioning sponsored by rose communications captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org tavis: good evening. smiley. tonight a conversation with the longest serving independent in congressional history, bernie sanders. he is a member of the senate budget committee, which puts him at the front seat of the budget battles. last week congress voted do we devoted to temporarily suspend the d
leon panetta and secretary of state hillary clinton. only clinton's replacement john kerry has won senate confirmation and taken up his new post. the national security moves one step closer to completion with tomorrow's hearing for c.i.a. nominee john brennan. the president's environmental and energy team will be completely reformed. in addition to salazar's exit at interior, lisa jackson is leaving as environmental protection agency chief as is energy secretary steven chu with no replacements announced yet. and mr. obama's economic team will also have new faces, as he moves to replace: labor secretary hilda solis, trade representative ron kirk and rebecca blank, the interim commerce secretary who replaced gary locke when he became ambassador to china. critical issues await them, from action on climate change, to the keystone x-l oil pipeline, to negotiations on new trade agreements with a dozen nations, and the european union. the president set the tone for the selections to come, with his description of jewell today. >> she knows the link between conservation and good jobs. she k
was also an economic advisor to president clinton. now he teaches at princeton. alan blinder's latest book is after the music stops, the financial crisis. the response and the work ahead. he says it tries to answer the question, how do we get into this mess and how do we get out of it? i am pleased to have alan blinder back on this program. welcome. >> thank you very much. charlie: i'll say this to you. if you're going to write a book, then you need somebody to endorse it. this is not bad. a master piece. simple. straightforward. and wise. president william j. clinton. >> i have to admit i was pretty pleased with that endorsement. >> he actually read the book. i thought he would skim it. >> charlie: could you tell for sure. >> i wasn't going to do that. i think it's impolite to a former' president. >> charlie: you think he read the book. >> he said he read the book. charlie: here was the question though. before we talk about the book. let's talk about where we are today. we had a dip in the fourth quarter. do you read anything into that? >> not very much. we had a dip in the fourth imparte
lew served in the clinton administration. i think he worked in the omb in the, you know, office of management of the budget. and he was one of the key players in helping pass the repeal of glass-steagall. and, you know, this is kind of the way it works. it's not a one to one, you know, obvious connection. but, you know, glass-steagall was repealed specifically to legalize the merger of citigroup. and, you know, coincidentally bob rubin, who was the treasury secretary and jack lew end up working at citigroup five, ten years later. and they make enormous amounts of money. and then they go back to government. and again, this is just sort of this merry-go-round that everybody in washington knows about. and that's the way it works. >> how do you explain president obama's attitude in this? when he was running for president, he promised the close the revolving door. and he seemed genuinely shocked at the collapse of the financial system and the banks' role in it. but he also was raking in massive campaign contributions from these very people. did those investments, did those contributi
of the senate. former u.s. army staff sergeant clinton romesha received the nation's highest military decoration this afternoon, the medal of honor. on october 3, 2009, in northeastern afghanistan, he and bher ameca were attacked atmbpocoutea o k.stngti30mb outk lhe dteespera l day-long battle despite being wounded, and killed at least ten insurgents himself. at the white house today, president obama said romesha risked his life to rescue the wounded and retrieve bodies. >> clint romesha lives the soldier's creed: "i will never leave a fallen comrade." so he and his team started charging as enemy fire poured down, and they kept charging, 50 meters, 80 meters, ultimately 100 meters run through a hail of bullets. they reached their fallen friends, and they brought them home. >> sreenivasan: romesha is only the fourth living medal of honor recipient for actions in iraq or afghanistan. on wall street today, trading was light, and stocks drifted lower. the dow jones industrial average lost more than 21 points to close at 13,971. the nasdaq fell a little less than two points to close at 3192. those ar
from leon panetta and from david petraeus at ci and from hillary clinton at state to do something. >> so what happened, i believe, and i did a lot of reporting on it. and actually it was an article that i worked on with mark rangler that was the basis of the question that elicited secretary panetta's response. in iraq training the troops was looking for a way in syria. he wanted not only to influence the situation on the ground now but assuming assad is deposed, the thought was it would be beneficial from the united states had some stronger relationships with the fighting groups of groups inside syria. the people actually in control the ground. then secretary of state hillary clinton supported that argument. so did leon panetta and general dempsey. that was brought to the whitehouse before the election not a political climb to do something controversial like that but it would have been a limited operation in the sense they weren't going to provide what they call man pads, air defense weapons because they didn't want to risk them falling into the wrong hands and endangering israel
and the democrats have averaged one hour and 14 minutes, bill clinton. an hour and five minutes, barack obama. ronald reagan averaged 40 min tonight's his state of the union and richard nixon averaged 35 minutes. >> woodruff: that counts applause. >> that counts applause. i think he would endear himself to the nation if he just stood up and said i'm going to... >> that should be a voting issue all by itself. who do you vote for? >> woodruff: are you saying there's been a lack of urgency coming out of the white house? >> i think there's a lot of important issues that they've emphasized. gun control or immigration or training and research. but i mean what is it that comes out that the president says this is what defines my presidency? david is right. he was far more assertive, in his inaugural address than he was in his first term. i guess we expect that to continue. is there an olive branch offered? i mean, is there a sense or is there going to be the republicans have lost five of the last six elections in the popular vote. five of the last elections they lost senate seats. they lost the house
it's hard, charlie, i really do. >> rose: secretary of state clinton, who you worked with, panetta petraeus, all recommended we do something. and the president said no, and you say the president was right to say no and other people can ask this question: how many syrians have to die before the west does something? >> well, i think this has to constantly be reexamined. as i understand it, the president is looking at things again. trying to figure out -- i talk about something called-- i made this up-- the doability doctrine. >> rose: right. >> can we really make a difference? and i know some people have compared it to the we did something military in libya with nato. very different kind of situation because the libyan army basically didn't exit. the question is whether there's value in creating a no-fly zone. whether it would really do something useful. whether -- the questions i would ask is whether the assad military regime has been weakened so that in fact there can be a functional no-fly zone. the other question i would ask is how many arms are needed there? as i understand it,
. >> president clinton spoke it 500 times. >> taxes. taxes. taxes. >> taxes rose under bush, have, of course, eventually sunk his re-election campaign. >> no new taxes. >> and reagan -- >> spending cuts. spending. spending, spending. >> carter was preoccupied elsewhere. >> soviet union. soviet union. >> he combined to say soviet more times in three addresses than reagan did in seven. the most six most used words. >> americans. americans. >> people must work. >> joe deaux. thestreet.com for n.b.r. >> susie: there's a lesson to learn from the struggles of smartphone maker blackberry. it's important to remember that sometimes you have to take a big risk in order to reap the rewards. sports analyst rick horrow explains in this week's "beyond the scoreboard." >> in the next few weeks, blackberry will begin selling its highly anticipated q-10 and z-10 smartphones with the hopes of regaining market share. and unlike other companies in the cell phone space-- like service providers at&t and verizon, and device maker samsung-- blackberry has never been an aggressive spender on sports advertising or sp
that hillary clinton an sarah palin are eligible to be president and vice presidentment but it has to mean that. >> rose: where do you think it might be amended in the future. >> that's the last chapter. >> rose: i know. >> there are different ways of thinking about an unwritten constitution. and i end with the constitution still to be written, the constitution of the future, of 2020, of 2121, of 2222. the unfinished constitution and i offer a few thoughts on that. one thing is we have to think seriously about that. if we can talk, spend a lot of time thinking about stuff that happened 250 years ago, we need to be thinking about posterity, about what the constitution that we should we qooelt to people 250 years from now. here with my principleses. number one that any constitutional amendment as a practical mat never today's world is going to have to satisfy both the republicans and the democrats. there is a chapter on the party system t in effect built t that is part of our unwritten constitution, we have a two party system and the gestures to a two party system, in a couple of ways, but a two
second term you're already a lame duck, how many stories have we already seen about hillary clinton in 2016 and who the republican potential candidates are going to be in 2016? that's a part of it. but i do think this is a white house that recognizes the reality of a divided congress in this polarized environment. i was looking back at the vote to ban assault weapons in 1994. back then you had 46 republicans who supported that ban. that's a remarkable thing. in this day and age you get 46 republicans to support president obama on anything, even if it was i love cookies day they wouldn't support it. so those republicans are gone. moderate democrats are gone. the pl president knows that in order to get something done in congress he's going to have to centrally be able to push it through whether there's an executive order or the only thing that will pass is something that republicanss can support because republicans are the ones who control congress. at the end of the day here's what i think is somewhat interesting. for republicans in congress these issues, guns and immigration, make t
're the guilty party. when they were throwing eggs at hillary clinton when she was out there the community obviously, the egyptian population is split. you have some who were strong supporters as arab spring as movement for freedom and liberty and so forth but you've also -- it's become a base of operations for the muslim brotherhood and the difficulty we have today is our friends and allies in that part of the world no longer trust us. they've seen, for example, that we're reluctant to support israel. they've seen us bail out of iraq. >> rose: how are we reluctant to support israel, as you just said. >> there's a sense -- >> rose: the israelis say that in terms of military support this administration has been as good an ally as they could have expected. >> well, what are they going to say? they're not going to be critical. >> rose: so you're saying they're not telling the truth? >> i think they're speaking diplomatically. but i think if you go and look at that part of the world-- and i still talk to a lot of folks from out there-- both in the arab and the israeli world, they have major do
states who is part of this book. >> he's not a big schmoozer himself. >> rose: far cry from bill clinton. >> no, that's right. or lyndon b johnson. >> rose: or teddy kennedy. >> that's right, that's right. >> rose: they seemed to thrive on the flesh. >> yeah, he obviously doesn't. and. >> rose: but is he funny? >> i don't know how funny he is. i think that this campaign, this campaign was a lot about what would happen on the ground, as you know. and the obama people reminded me, remember old pauls in american cities, the kind of politician who knew every pole watcher by first name and all that. when they wanted to compliment somebody who they think really understands how thing works, they would say the man can count. >> rose: yes. >> that's right. >> and obama's guy kos count. >> rose: they could count, yes. >> and so they didn't have what was going on in their favor in 2008, the sort of excitement of it, the people's. >> rose: they are also good at gee-- geography. they can take somebody that wants to vote to the place where they can vote, that's a big deal. >> and this is a more effect
steinem. you're very much a part of the film. betty friedan. supreme court justices, hillary clinton but there are also ordinary women who are heroes of this film. a woman who was working for a telephone company in atlanta who challenged her employer. a woman who worked for a mining company. where did those women get that courage that they displayed? >> well, i think we get it from each other. that's why it's so important to see this film because we do what we see not what we're told. in my textbook when i was in college, there was one sentence that said women were given the vote. and that was it. we were left thinking that, you know, we got privileges from on high which just isn't the way it works. and to see the coal miner and to see a great woman in history like eileen hernandez who was on the equal employment commission and who was the president of now, who played a huge role certainly at least as much as me, more. yet people don't know her. so this is a real mix of totally unknown, should be well known, a few who are well known. it's real life. and it is, to me, in a way the beg
the glass-steagall act, and president bill clinton signed the repeal. >> it was a bipartisan repeal. >> right. it's a joke. that allowed the banks to make risky bets with their depositor's money. eight years later, our financial system collapsed. it's like a joke. this is a system that creates in the private enterprise a core mechanism and a logic that makes them do the very things that need regulation and then makes them evade or undo those regulations. >> you probably saw the recent story that facebook, which made more than $1 billion in profits last year, didn't pay taxes on that profit and actually got a $429 million rebate from you and me and all those other taxpayers out there. ge, verizo corporations made a combined $205 billion in profits between 2008 and 2011 and 26 paid no federal corporate income tax. what will ultimately happen, richard, if the big winners from capitalism opt out of participating in the strengthening, nurturing, and financial support of a fair and functioning society? >> well, the worst example i just learned about a few days ago. and i got it actually f
to exit the door wanting to shake every single hand. i remember when president clinton was in office, reaching three and four and five rows back to make sure he didn't miss a single hand. on his way out the door. >> and the pages. they line up back there. >> woodruff: we will wait a few minutes before we hear from senator rubio. let's go back and talk about what the president had to say, david. when it comes to the deficit. and dealing with the debt. it sounded to me as if he not only stood his... he didn't say anything new but he stood his ground. he said, i don't believe this country needs to do something about taxes, cut taxes on the backs of senior citizens who are counting on medicare and counting on social security. >> though he did very interestingly say he was in favor of modest medicare reform. he's always given a sort of gesture to that. it was not enthusiastically embraced by a crowd. there was not a standing ovation for reforming medicare >> woodruff: didn't he say, i'm referring to those wealthy seniors, seniors who are, you know, who are at the the higher income bracket
Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)

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